Always Be Collecting Feedback

As part of our ongoing efforts to get to know our users better, the UCSF Library web team decided we wanted some of that sweet, sweet microfeedback action, and so we deployed a very short satisfaction survey at library.ucsf.edu back in July.

How Are We Doing tabAnytime a patron clicked the How Are We Doing button at the bottom of every page, they were asked a simple question: How would you rate your experience today? Patrons could let us know if they were satisfied or unsatisfied with their web experience.

Regardless of their answer, they’d be prompted to go into detail and provide some demographic information, but the only required question was whether they were satisfied/unsatisfied. Our hope was that keeping the survey short and to the point, and constantly available on every page, would encourage participation.

The not-so-secret goal of this survey structure was for the web team to learn directly from our patrons where they’re having problems, so that we make improvements to the website based on their needs and not our own assumptions. Our thinking was that a user frustrated enough to leave a comment was a user we’d want to hear from.

Enough Background Already, What Did We Learn?

help-btnThe stats below are from July 7 through August 23, 2015, the day before we introduced our new Help feature. We’re excluding overlapping dates from this analysis because the Help button began competing with the How Are We Doing button for user attention (more on this below), and we wanted to base our analysis on clean data.

Of the 201 responses received during that period, 65% had a satisfactory experience at our site. Hooray!

If we drill down to the 76% of respondents who shared their demographic information, the overwhelming number of responses came from UCSF affiliates (94%), with Staff leading the way, closely followed by Faculty, then Students. It’s likely the data was skewed by the summer months, and it’ll be interesting to see if the affiliation breakdown changes now that the fall semester is in full swing.

satisfaction-by-affiliation

Patron satisfaction is awesome, but remember our not-so-secret goal was to learn why our users are unsatisfied. While only 20% of all respondents bothered to comment at all, our hypothesis about frustrated users being more likely to go into detail was correct: 87% of comments came from unsatisfied users. Hooray (really)!

Unsatisfied Users are More Likely to Comment

What’s Making our Users Unhappy?

Most of the frustration came from patrons who felt that navigating the site and finding what they needed was just too hard. 2nd prize for user frustration goes to remote access issues, with patrons expressing difficulties getting to articles using EZproxy, UC-eLinks, and VPN.

Connection errors and Library service issues (comments like you don’t have a book I want and my barcode number doesn’t work anymore) tied for 3rd place, and I was personally amused and humbled to know that 9% of the feedback was about how annoying they found the feedback survey popup window (removed after a few weeks).

Unsatisfied Users - Comments Breakdown
* If a patron gave feedback in more than one category, I picked the dominant issue.

So What’s Next?

We were fortunate to meet with some respondents, and we used their comments and other key takeaways from our satisfaction survey, the interviews we conducted with our customer-facing staff, and the LibQUAL 2013 survey to finalize the Library User Personas we’ll rely on as we make changes going forward.

We’ll keep our satisfaction survey going, but with the successful rollout of the Help feature, the time has come to modify how we ask for feedback. The How Are We Doing and Help buttons serve different purposes; unfortunately, the current design doesn’t make that distinction clear. Getting requests for help in the satisfaction survey gave us useful information before we rolled out the Help feature, but now it’s more appropriate that help me please comments get routed to the right person right away for faster customer service.

We’ll launch our more low-key request for feedback this week.

New Feedback Button
The new Feedback button will live at the bottom of every web page.

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