Accessions & Additions – Summer Edition

We’re always busy accepting new collections and pushing through our backlog to make as many collections available for research as possible. This list of new records includes materials relating to tobacco control, UCSF, infectious disease, pediatrics, nursing education, HIV/AIDS Toland Hall murals, book collecting, medical education, and more. Click on the titles below to learn more the contents, subjects, and size of these collections.

Contact us if you have any questions or would like to learn more. And please don’t hesitate to make an appointment to come in and use the collections!

Our catalog updates over the past six months:

The following collections have inventories or finding aids on the Online Archive of California:

New Exhibit: The Radiologic Imaging Laboratory Archive

Visionary Bioengineering: The Radiologic Imaging Laboratory Archive                       UCSF Library, 530 Parnassus Avenue, 3rd floor, San Francisco, CA                             Now through May 2016                                                                                                   Free and open to the public during library hours

Image of MRI scan prepared for scientific publications and sales meetings, circa 1985, RIL records, MSS 2002-08

Image of MRI scan prepared for scientific publications and sales meetings, circa 1985, RIL records, MSS 2002-08

Come visit the UCSF Library and view our “sneak peek” exhibit on the history of the Radiologic Imaging Laboratory (RIL). The RIL was founded in the late 1970s by a team of UCSF scientists and engineers. The team’s goal was to create a clinically viable diagnostic tool using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, later called MRI. Over the course of 25 years, the lab developed innovative MRI technology that transformed the way doctors diagnose and treat patients worldwide.

RIL graduate student researcher Tim Mills with imaging machine, 1986, Photograph collection

RIL graduate student researcher Tim Mills with imaging machine, 1986, Photograph collection

View images and original documents from the RIL records and learn how the lab combined entrepreneurship and biotechnology research. Join us again in the coming year for the full exhibit where we’ll further explore the RIL’s growth and technological discoveries.

Researchers and technicians Lawrence Crooks, Bob McCree, Ian Duff, and Roger Littlewood, circa 1981, Photograph collection

Researchers and technicians Lawrence Crooks, Bob McCree, Ian Duff, and Roger Littlewood in laboratory, circa 1981, Photograph collection

We’re excited to share this archive with the public. To learn more about using the RIL records (MSS 2002-08) for research, contact the UCSF Archives and Special Collections.

May Video Capsule at Bay Area Video Coalition

This is the second year we’ll be participating in this event to celebrate local audiovisual treasures. The breadth of last year’s showing was immense– so many facets of Bay Area history were represented. This year we’re contributing a couple of clips from the UCSF School of Pharmacy of the 1960s.

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Join Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) Preservation program staff for an evening of audiovisual preservation revelry. Anchored by recent selections from BAVC’s Preservation Access Program* (PAP), tonight’s program includes archivist favorites, unexpected gems, and rarely seen treats from artist-and arts organization-participants in PAP, as well as from other Bay Area preservation organizations— including Stanford Media Preservation Lab, Internet Archive, Oddball Films, UCSF Archives, the GLBT Historical Society and California Audiovisual Preservation Project. We look forward to sharing recent and prized preservation work for what is sure to be a congenial celebration of archival craft and our media legacy.

When: May 14, 2015 | 7PM |

Where: BAVC | 2727 Mariposa St., 2nd Flr. San Francisco, CA 94110

Admission: $10 suggested donation. Let us know you’re coming. RSVP here!

We hope to see you there! And if you’d like to see what we screened last year, click over to the Internet Archive to see UCSF’s moving memento films from the 1930s.