New Faces in Archives

Kelsi Evans

Kelsi Evans

Kelsi Evans
Our new Assistant Research Archivist, Kelsi Evans who joined the archives team a month ago, will help with research and organization for several onsite and online exhibits, as well as processing, cataloging, digitization, and social media projects related to the University sesquicentennial. She will respond to reference requests relating to UCSF History and 150th anniversary, research and provide historical information for UCSF schools and departments. Kelsi will be contributing to the Archives blog and support Archives outreach programs.
She will also spend half of her time completing processing of the Lawrence Crooks Radiologic Imaging Laboratory Records and establishing the Lawrence Crooks Radiologic Imaging Technology Digital Collection.
Dr. Crooks’ collection provides insights into the history of the development and testing of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. The material donated by Dr. Crooks is a major addition to the archives holdings and is treasured for its high scholarly value and ability to broaden research perspective. Some of these treasures are lacking intellectual control and have no or minimal descriptive data. The goal of this project is to create a detailed finding aid and digitize a sizable and significant part of this material to build a comprehensive on-line collection. The archives will produce an exhibit at the UCSF library showcasing the key documents and artifacts. Subsequently, an online companion exhibit will be built and will be accessible through the UCSF library site.
Kelsi holds a master’s degree in Archives and Public History from New York University and completed graduate coursework in American History at UC Santa Cruz. She has worked as an archivist in the Fales Library and Special Collections at NYU, the Foundation for Landscape Studies in NYC, and the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami. Additionally, she has planned events and coordinated volunteers for non-profit organizations, including Old Spanish Days Fiesta in Santa Barbara. Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Kelsi has lived in the Bay Area for the past several years and enjoys California’s farmers’ markets and beaches.

Armani Fontanilla

Armani Fontanilla

Armani Fontanilla

This fall semester the UCSF Archives & Special Collections is hosting an intern from the University of San Francisco (USF) public history program. Armani is currently a senior at the USF majoring in History with an emphasis on European and Asian Studies. He is originally from San Jose, and has lived in California his entire life. After he graduates from USF, he hopes to be able to earn a teaching position at his old high school, Bellarmine College Preparatory, and eventually pursue a Masters. In choosing the UCSF archives through the USF internship program, he hopes to not only practice skills that can only be found through working at an established institution but to also enhance his ability to do archival work and explore history of Western medicine at the archives.
Armani is working on organizing and creating an inventory of biographical files. This frequently consulted collection includes CVs, newspaper clippings, obituaries, bio sketches of hundreds of UCSF researchers, clinicians, staff, and alumni. Armani will also assist with digitizing images and documents for the University sesquicentennial events.

Through the Years: The History of Dr. Eddie Leong Way

In the spirit of UCSF’s 150th anniversary, a new addition to the archives has been made: the history of our very own Dr. Eddie Leong Way.   The addition is very much relevant to the anniversary, as Dr. Way himself has contributed much to the school’s 150 years.  In fact, he makes up many of those years, himself.

E. Leong Way and Chauncey D. Leake in Atlantic City at the first Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) meeting after WWII, April 1946.

E. Leong Way and Chauncey D. Leake in Atlantic City at the first Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) meeting after WWII, April 1946.

Born in San Francisco, Dr. Way earned his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley before going on to obtain his PhD in pharmaceutical chemistry from UCSF’s very own School of Pharmacy.  However, his involvement with the school did not simply stop at his educational background.  Dr. Way worked as a professor at UCSF for years after his graduation, only retiring in 1987.  His career primarily focused on the development of physical dependence and tolerance of opiates.  It comes as no surprise, then, that such extensive work has contributed to creating a generally much more improved and deeper understanding of addiction.

Spending some days in the archives, I had the fascinating task of working through Dr. Way’s time and work here at UCSF, from the beginning of his career to years after its official end.  As I leafed through pages and pictures, both brittle with age and sleek with freshness, I felt the pleasant weight of history at my fingertips.   Some of the files dated back to as early as 1939, and some as recent as 2008.

E. Leong Way and Harry Iwamoto, UCSF School of Pharmacy Class of 1938, March 10, 1986.

E. Leong Way and Harry Iwamoto, UCSF School of Pharmacy Class of 1938, March 10, 1986.

All sorts of documents made their way to the archives.  Several of his publications and publication listings; various correspondences with other faculty members and students; notes and slides from his own lectures; even invitations and party photos!  Work and play all mingle together in the collection to form the personal history of this astounding individual.  His files dictating his time and effort spent towards the betterment of the UCSF School of Pharmacy and even the world of pharmacy as a whole are now preserved in UCSF’s extensive and detailed archives, where they shall most certainly remain safe and sound.

For more information please see the library catalog record and finding aid for the Way papers.

Alexandra GiacominiAlex Giacomini was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is vastly interested in writing and the humanities, and is currently a communications intern in UCSF’s School of Pharmacy.   Alex is a rising senior at UC Berkeley, where she is working to attain her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature.

The Life and Times of a Newbie Intern

Alexandra Giacomini

Before me there stood a great, big wall.  An obstacle.  A fortress.  Well, metaphorically speaking, in any case.  However, the five archival boxes full of various documents and files seemed as large as the tallest gate to me.  Being a lowly intern, I must admit that I was a bit intimidated.  After all, it was my responsibility to sort and organize all of these files.

The documents all pertained to the life and career of Dr. E (‘Eddie’) Leong Way, one of UCSF’s oldest alumni, and a great contributor to the understanding of opiate addiction and reliance.  Unfortunately, their previous keepers did not properly store the files.  They were in some small state of disarray, stuffed in varying folders and envelopes, stacked on top of each other, and even, in some cases, in incorrect boxes.

It was my job to remove the files from their initial place and sort them properly.  I took them out of their different folders and placed them in official, archival ones, meant for preserving and protecting files more efficiently than other folders.  Each folder must be labeled and numbered properly as well.  After that, they are to be placed in official, archival boxes.  And, lastly, I had to write up the inventories for each of the boxes.

It was a long, time-consuming task, requiring precision and a good deal of attention.  Admittedly, it was a bit frustrating at times.  However, that did not prevent it from being a great experience.  It was fascinating to get insight into the work required in the archives.  More importantly, it helped me understand the hard work others put into these tasks and others, as well as appreciate the importance of preserving and organizing the archives affectively and efficiently.  If I were to be perfectly honest, I wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.

For more information please see the library catalog record and finding aid for the Way papers.

Alex Giacomini was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is vastly interested in writing and the humanities, and is currently a communications intern in UCSF’s School of Pharmacy.   Alex is a rising senior at UC Berkeley, where she is working to attain her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature.