New Exhibit: The Radiologic Imaging Laboratory Archive

Visionary Bioengineering: The Radiologic Imaging Laboratory Archive                       UCSF Library, 530 Parnassus Avenue, 3rd floor, San Francisco, CA                             Now through May 2016                                                                                                   Free and open to the public during library hours

Image of MRI scan prepared for scientific publications and sales meetings, circa 1985, RIL records, MSS 2002-08

Image of MRI scan prepared for scientific publications and sales meetings, circa 1985, RIL records, MSS 2002-08

Come visit the UCSF Library and view our “sneak peek” exhibit on the history of the Radiologic Imaging Laboratory (RIL). The RIL was founded in the late 1970s by a team of UCSF scientists and engineers. The team’s goal was to create a clinically viable diagnostic tool using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, later called MRI. Over the course of 25 years, the lab developed innovative MRI technology that transformed the way doctors diagnose and treat patients worldwide.

RIL graduate student researcher Tim Mills with imaging machine, 1986, Photograph collection

RIL graduate student researcher Tim Mills with imaging machine, 1986, Photograph collection

View images and original documents from the RIL records and learn how the lab combined entrepreneurship and biotechnology research. Join us again in the coming year for the full exhibit where we’ll further explore the RIL’s growth and technological discoveries.

Researchers and technicians Lawrence Crooks, Bob McCree, Ian Duff, and Roger Littlewood, circa 1981, Photograph collection

Researchers and technicians Lawrence Crooks, Bob McCree, Ian Duff, and Roger Littlewood in laboratory, circa 1981, Photograph collection

We’re excited to share this archive with the public. To learn more about using the RIL records (MSS 2002-08) for research, contact the UCSF Archives and Special Collections.

Science and Art: Saxton T. Pope Research Illustrations

From 1912-1913, UC surgeon Saxton T. Pope kept a notebook detailing his laboratory research. Throughout the record, he included drawings of the experimental medical instruments and procedures he was developing.

Saxton Temple Pope (1875-1926)

Saxton Temple Pope (1875-1926)

Two of the more elaborate illustrations in the notebook detail his work with ether administration. Ether was commonly used in the 19th and early 20th century as an anesthetic during surgical procedures.

Saxton T. Pope illustration of intratracheal insufflation apparatus, MSS 26-3

Saxton T. Pope illustration of intratracheal insufflation apparatus, research notebook, MSS 26-3

Saxton T. Pope illustration of intra-tratracheal anaesthesia apparatus, MSS 26-3

Saxton T. Pope illustration of intra-tratracheal anaesthesia apparatus, research notebook, MSS 26-3

To see more from the notebook and learn about Pope and his work, make an appointment to see the Saxton Temple Pope papers, MSS 26-3.

Exploring the Archives for 150: Attend a $3 course, circa 1879

In preparation for UCSF’s 150th anniversary celebration exhibits, we’ve been doing a bit of exploring in the vaults. For the next several months, I’ll be posting some of the treasures we’ve discovered!

Check out the course registration process for UC Medical Department student Felix Bettelheim in 1878 and 1879. Forms included lecture admission tickets to courses in anatomy and surgery. The back of the tickets would be signed by the professor as a way to track attendance.

Lecture admission ticket, 1879, ArchClass H152

Lecture admission ticket, 1879, ArchClass H152

Lecture admission card, 1878, ArchClass H152

Lecture admission ticket, 1878, ArchClass H152

Note Hugh Toland’s name as instructor of surgery. Toland founded Toland Medical College in 1864 and later deeded the school to the UC. His gift created the UC Medical Department and paved the way for the establishment of UCSF.

Lecture admission ticket, 1878, ArchClass H152

Lecture admission ticket to Toland’s course, 1878, ArchClass H152

Bettelheim received certificates for completing dissection courses. According to a note in the collection, tickets to dissection courses were closely monitored to “prevent the morbidly curious from attending.”

Dissection certificate, 1879, ArchClass H152

Dissection certificate, 1879, ArchClass H152

Bettelheim’s tuition looked a bit different than today. As noted in the receipt, it cost $3 to attend the assigned course of study. Bettelheim graduated in 1880, we hope debt free!

Course receipt, 1879, ArchClass H152

Course receipt, 1879, ArchClass H152