Chemistry labs of Barlet

Among the many jewels of our rare book collection is Annibal Barlet’s work of 1657 Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie

The volume has been rebound in vellum. It is 626 pages with a woodcut frontispiece and contains 37 full-page woodcuts illustrating the diverse operations of alchemical processes in detail.

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Woodcuts depict various chemical apparatus and operations of a laboratory in the mid 17th century. Barlet gives accounts of instruments, vessels, processes, minerals, and recipes.

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Our copy has been digitized and is available in full via the HathiTrust Digital Library.

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

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Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

 

Viewing Zakheim Murals at UCSF

As part of UCSF’s 150th anniversary celebration, the university has arranged special public viewing hours for the Zakheim murals through the spring:

Friday, March 13th:  4 – 7 p.m.
Friday, April 17th:  3 – 5 p.m.
Friday, May 22nd:  3 – 5 p.m.

Location:
Toland Hall on the UCSF Campus
533 Parnassus Ave., Room U-142
San Francisco, CA
Map of UCSF Parnassus Campus and Directions (printable PDF)

Recent article in San Francisco Chronicle highlights history of the Zakheim murals at UCSF.

Do you have questions or need additional information about public viewing?
Please contact UCSF Public Affairs: 415-476-2557

Early MRI Scans

We’re currently processing the Radiologic Imaging Laboratory records, 1968-2000. The collection contains numerous images of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The images help document the lab’s achievements in MRI research and illustrate dramatic developments in the technology.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1986, MSS 2002-08. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1986. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen. MSS 2002-08

MRI scan images come in several formats in the collection. These include marketing prints and slides, transparent film sheets and negatives, and Polaroid photographs. Lab researchers used Polaroid cameras to capture images on computer screens created by in-development software and hardware.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1988, MSS 2002-08. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1988. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen. MSS 2002-08

Several of the laboratory notebooks in the collection contain Polaroid photographs fastened right to the page, with research notes and data surrounding them.

Laboratory notebook of Lawrence Crooks with scan images, 1983. MSS 2002-08

Laboratory notebook of Lawrence Crooks with scan images, 1983 (subject’s name redacted). MSS 2002-08

As you move chronologically through the collection, you can see the MRI scans becoming clearer and clearer as lab researchers improved the technology. You can also chart changes in the lab’s research subjects. Image subjects transition from phantom objects (containers often filled with baby oil and water) to lab animals and RIL staff and patients.

Prints prepared for a 1985 Diasonics/RIL sales meeting. MSS 2002-08

Prints prepared for a 1985 Diasonics/RIL sales meeting. MSS 2002-08

Though the images present preservation challenges, they contribute greatly to the research value of the collection. Using the scans, you can witness the lab’s growth through different phases of MRI research and development.